Volumes

by publication dates
October 2017 (1)
July 2017 (1)
December 2016 (2)
November 2016 (1)
October 2016 (1)
February 2016 (1)
December 2015 (4)
September 2015 (2)
July 2015 (1)
March 2015 (1)
December 2014 (3)
July 2014 (2)
May 2014 (1)
December 2013 (4)
October 2013 (1)
March 2013 (1)
January 2013 (1)
December 2012 (6)
October 2012 (2)
July 2012 (1)
January 2012 (1)
December 2011 (3)
November 2011 (1)
October 2011 (1)
September 2011 (1)
August 2011 (1)
May 2011 (1)
March 2011 (1)
February 2011 (1)
August 2010 (1)
June 2010 (2)
May 2010 (2)
April 2010 (1)
March 2010 (2)
February 2010 (2)
December 2009 (1)
October 2009 (6)
September 2009 (2)
August 2009 (2)
July 2009 (1)
April 2009 (1)
February 2009 (7)
January 2009 (5)
December 2008 (1)
October 2008 (1)
September 2008 (4)
August 2008 (4)
June 2008 (1)
May 2008 (1)
April 2008 (1)
February 2008 (4)
January 2008 (3)
December 2007 (5)
November 2007 (2)
August 2007 (1)
June 2007 (3)
May 2007 (4)
March 2007 (3)
February 2007 (1)
January 2007 (1)
November 2006 (1)
October 2006 (1)
September 2006 (3)
June 2006 (1)
May 2006 (1)
April 2006 (2)
February 2006 (2)
January 2006 (2)
December 2005 (7)
November 2005 (1)
October 2005 (5)
September 2005 (1)
June 2005 (1)
April 2005 (3)
March 2005 (16)
February 2005 (4)
January 2005 (6)
December 2004 (2)
November 2004 (7)
October 2004 (1)
September 2004 (12)
December 2003 (4)
October 2003 (37)
March 2003 (13)
December 2002 (7)
December 2001 (7)
December 2000 (34)
October 1999 (21)
November 1998 (6)
October 1998 (18)
December 1997 (28)
April 1997 (7)
October 1996 (13)
September 1996 (1)
April 1996 (9)
October 1994 (8)
July 1994 (9)
December 1993 (1)
December 1992 (26)
January 1992 (9)
February 1991 (9)
December 1990 (3)
December 1989 (8)
October 1989 (9)
December 1988 (9)
December 1987 (11)
December 1986 (11)
December 1985 (10)
June 1985 (11)
November 1984 (12)
January 1984 (18)
July 1983 (1)
December 1982 (12)
May 1982 (9)
November 1981 (12)
November 1980 (12)


JNAFS

01

G. Valdimarsson

Icelandic Fisheries Laboratories
Skulagata 4, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland

Source - Journal of Northwest Atlantic Fishery Science, Volume 23: 233-249
ISSN-0250-6408

Abstract

It is estimated that the marine fisheries are presently at its full potential, i.e. 82-83 million tons per year. As wild fish select their own food they provide the most natural source of animal protein available to mankind. Yet, there is significant potential in better utilization of the marine resources. One third of the ocean catch, or 27 million tons, is discarded at sea every year, fish material that could be processed in various ways. Also, the processing industry can improve yields, use more of the "fish waste" not to mention improving quality of products. The fish processing industry is unique in the way how its raw material is obtained. In most cases fishermen compete with one another to get as much fish as possible from a common source and the raw material is free of charge. This leads to a "quantity mentality" that impairs development of the industry in terms of utilisation and quality of products. The Icelandic economy is highly dependent on fisheries as some 54% of her currency earnings come from fish exports even though only 11% of the workforce is engaged in fisheries and fish processing. In 1984 all the major fish stocks were subjected to individual quotas and in 1990 the quotas were made transferable between vessels. Today over 90% of the landed fish by value is subject to this system. The objective of the management system is to minimize the cost of catching and processing and to maximize the value of the catch. Increased confidence in the scientific advice on state of the resource coupled with firm fisheries control seems to be affecting the fish processing industry in a very positive way. Companies have been restructuring and specializing their processing and marketing. Many private companies have been merging, opening up to new shareholders and being registered on the stock market. Catching is getting more even throughout the year and there are several indicators that quality of the fish is improving due to better handling. Introduction of sophisticated technologies has cut cost. Vision technology and computerized systems are increasingly being used for producing high value products and monitoring quality and yields. Many companies are making an effort in product development, in marketing unconventional species and producing foods from "fish waste". Sound scientific knowledge on the fish stocks coupled with firm management seems to be turning the industry mentality from hunting into mariculture. Given the right institutional and economic framework the fish processing industry will make quality products from all catches - including by-catches and "fish waste".

Language - English
Publisher - Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO), Dartmouth, N.S., Canada
Publication Date - October 1998
Publication Type - Journal Article

Posted in: Volume 23 - 1998
Actions: E-mail | Permalink |

Related Files